Care and Love Blog

5 Reasons To Adopt An Older Dog

5 Reasons To Adopt An Older Dog

Let’s be honest, puppies are stinkin’ cute. Even when they aren’t cute, they are still CUTE. We see a picture of a tiny pup and our cute aggression overwhelms us. It is our natural instinct to want to shelter and protect these baby animals, but what about older dogs?  While some people may not get that overwhelming urge to “squish” a full grown dog, there are plenty of reasons why they are amazing. Here are 5 reasons why you should consider adopting an older dog:   Get Your Beauty Sleep What many people fail to consider when they first adopt that tiny pup is that they don’t just need a lot of attention, they need it around the clock. Think your puppy will just hit the hay when you do? Think again. You will be woken up by desperate cries throughout the night. With older dogs, most of them will sleep through the night, no problem.   Calmer Environment No one wants to come home from work to a chewed up house, and be greeted by their dog running laps around their breakable furniture. Not only will older dogs sleep through the night, but probably for most of the day as well! This doesn’t mean you don’t have to exercise your older dog, but it will help you achieve that “chill zone” we all desperately want after a long day.   Old Dogs Can Learn New Tricks People are always saying “old dogs can’t learn new tricks” but oh, how wrong they are! With the same care and dedication you would put into training a puppy, older dogs can... read more
Let Your Pets Have Fun, Even When You Can’t!

Let Your Pets Have Fun, Even When You Can’t!

Just like their humans, pets can get bored easily. Yet it is unrealistic to expect a pet owner to be there to entertain their pets 24/7. Instead, owners can do some simple things to help their pets stay mentally stimulated even when they have to go to work or run an errand. Here are 8 simple cost-efficient ways to help keep your pets entertained while you are away! What are your favorite ways to keep your pets entertained? Comment below!... read more
The Six Stages Of A Dog’s Life

The Six Stages Of A Dog’s Life

Most people think there are two, maybe three stages of a dog’s life. There’s the puppy age, of course! But after that, unless our dogs live to be very old, we don’t perceive as much variation in the stages of a dog’s life. But experts have actually categorized six different life phases, all with different needs. First, of course, there’s the puppy stage. Puppies need to be fed more often than mature dogs. This is when you have to start the work of house training, obedience, and spaying and neutering. But if you feel overwhelmed, a puppy’s inherent cuteness makes everything worthwhile! Second comes the junior stage. At this point, your dog is able to reproduce, but still growing, so she isn’t fully an adult yet. Depending on breed, this stage falls between 6 and 12 months of age. These dogs still need some discipline, but they’re a bit more manageable than puppies. If you haven’t spayed or neutered yet, the time is now! Stage 3 is the adult stage. Your dog has stopped growing. He only needs to be fed twice a day. Physically, your dog is at his peak. Believe it or not, there are three more stages of your dog’s life! Number four is the mature stage. Yep, middle age! And just like with humans, your dog probably has a tendency to put on weight. Make sure she’s getting regular exercise! Your dog could also benefit from regular checkups to ensure optimal health. Stage 5 is the senior stage. At this point, your dog has reached the last quarter of his breed’s expectancy. Not all dogs... read more
Meet Gracie!

Meet Gracie!

This beauty is seventeen-year-old Gracie. She’s self-sufficient in the exercise department. After pushing and chasing her big red ball all over the back yard, she sleeps for hours!... read more

Should You Be Worried About Your Dog’s Snoring?

Are you annoyed by your dog’s snoring? While it might not be as loud and obnoxious as your spouse’s, it can definitely keep you up at night. But beyond that, snoring could be a sign of a health issue. If you’re worried about your dog’s snoring, especially if it’s a recent occurrence, you’ll want your dog to get checked out right away.

read more

Welcoming Spring With Our Pets

Winter is now in our rearview mirror and we’re preparing to warmly welcome spring. The upcoming weekends are sure to be filled with home improvement projects, tending to the garden and ice tea breaks on the back patio. As you all know, the best part of all this springtime activity is being able to share it with our pets. They’re surely even more eager to spend more time outside than we are after a long winter. To ensure that you and your pets all enjoy the fresh air and blooming flowers this spring there are a few hazards to keep an eye out for.

read more

The Truth About Feeding Your Dog

You want what’s best for your pet. But how do you figure out what food is right for them? With the recent Beneful fiasco, you may feel more confused than ever about what, how, and when to feed your dog. Today, we’re going to break down some of the concerns about dog food to help set you straight.

read more
Meet Albie

Meet Albie

Albie is new to SHPC. This little guy loves his daily walks… his LONG daily walks! Albie is our guide through the neighborhood. Somehow, he always has stored up energy to play fetch in the back yard. This family landed on a fabulous rescue... read more
Is Your Cat’s Grooming Normal?

Is Your Cat’s Grooming Normal?

You might have noticed that your cat spends a lot of time grooming yourself. Maybe you’ve even worried that she’s grooming too much. But how do you know? First, it’s normal for cats to groom often. In fact, adult cats spend up to 50% of their waking hours grooming! No, your cat isn’t vain. Grooming has a number of important benefits. For one thing, it helps them keep cool when it’s hot outside. It also serves as a way to self-medicate if your cat has a cut; their saliva contains a natural antibiotic. Plus, grooming is a source of stress relief. It feels good. Not to mention that there’s an instinctual component. By removing traces of food or other scented matter from their fur, cats can ward of predators in the wild. That instinct hasn’t died in house cats! When cats groom each other, it’s also a sign of friendship and bonding. So it makes sense that your cat invests a lot into his appearance! If your cat is grooming too much, you’ll notice fur falling out, especially in patches. This isn’t normal shedding; there will be bald spots. Cats can overgroom for a number of reasons. Stress is a big one. There could also be a medical issue such as a thyroid problem. If you notice your cat is overgrooming you should see your vet right away. Thyroid issues in particular can be extremely dangerous for your cat’s long-term health. Undergrooming is also a problem that requires vet attention. If your cat’s coat is getting too thick, or it’s dull, they’re not grooming enough. Contrary to popular belief,... read more
Meet Buster And Bronco!

Meet Buster And Bronco!

Buster and Bronco are beagle siblings who take fun to the next level! From chasing a new scent in the yard, playing chase with each other, or simply getting their tan on, they entertain us daily. There’s never a boring moment when we get to visit... read more

Keeping Your Home Clean And Your Pet Safe

A clean home is essential to the health of you, your family, and of course, your pet! As it turns out, some of the products we use to keep our homes clean aren’t so healthy for the animals who live with us. You already take care to keep chemicals out of reach so your pet can’t eat or drink them, but many common household cleaners contain chemicals that linger in the air when they’re used. When dogs and cats breathe them in, they can cause problems over time. While there’s also some concern about how cleaning chemicals affect human health, the fact is that we have bigger lungs and slower metabolisms than most dogs and cats. This means our bodies are less likely to be affected when we breathe them in. Smaller animals are not so lucky. With canine cancer on the rise (currently 1 in 4 dogs will die of cancer), and several household chemicals being linked to various types of cancers, you might want to consider changing the products you use. The easiest thing to do is buy organic cleaning products. (Be sure to check the label, because some companies get away with labeling things organic when they’re not.) If this is out of your budget, there are lots of recipes and tutorials online for making your own safe and effective supplies. Want to know more? Check out these great resources! “8 Common Household Chemicals Harming Your Pets & Their Non-Toxic Alternatives” from Eartheasy.com “Household Cleaning Products and Your Pet: What You Should Know About” by Dr. Justine Lee “Safe Cleaning Products For Your Pets” by Claire... read more

Should Your Pet Lose Weight In 2015?

This is the time of year when everyone is making resolutions. But should you be setting some goals for your pet as well? While most Americans resolve to lose weight in the new year, many of us don’t realize the extent to which pet obesity is a problem, or know what to do about it. Studies have shown that 44% of dogs and 57% of cats are overweight, with 10% of dogs and 17% of cats being considered obese. So what should you do if you think your pet has a weight problem? First, visit your vet. The doctor should not only check your pet’s weight, but also take blood and urine samples to ensure your cat or dog doesn’t have a metabolic disorder or thyroid problem. If the vet finds your pet is normal other than his or her weight, it’s time to implement a weight-loss plan. Your vet can help you tailor something to your animal’s specific needs, but below are some general tips to keep in mind. If you normally practice free feeding at home (meaning food is always available and your pet can eat whenever he wants), the first thing you want to consider is putting your pet on a feeding schedule and ensuring consistent portion control. Just as humans often have trouble determining adequate portion control for ourselves, we tend to have difficulty gauging the appropriate amount of food for our pets. Ask your vet what portion size is ideal. Cats and dogs are carnivores, and their systems are best equipped to handle diets high in protien and low on carbs. Unfortunately, much of... read more
Meet Sally

Meet Sally

Sally is an English Springer Spaniel. Only a couple of years old, she’s always on the go, go, go, go, go! No matter rain, sleet, cold, heat, her Texas-sized tongue pops out after our long walks. Good thing her walker Heather is a strong marathon runner! Sally keeps Heather on her toes. Even after a 40-minute walk or run, they come back and play fetch with her woobie The Bunny. Run, run,... read more

Don’t Freak Out If Your Dog Eats Poop

You’ve probably seen this: you’re out on a walk with your dog, his sniffs around at another animal’s poop… and then he tries to eat it! Or, he might try to eat his own poop immediately after relieving himself. (And if you’re not quick about it, he’s probably successful.) So what’s a dog owner to do?

read more

How Do I Choose The Right Pet Sitter?

How Do I Choose the Right Pet Sitter? Posted by Stayin’ Home Pet Care on December 03, 2014 :: Filed in If you’re planning on being out of town this holiday season and you don’t have a pet sitter lined up, you’re probably busy trying to find one! You have lots of options, so how do you choose? How do you know you’re getting the perfect fit for your pet? First, determine the level of service you need for your pet. Every animal has different needs. Does your pet just need a walk, playtime, and food? Or does she have special needs that require more attention and care? Knowing your needs from the outset will make it easier to select the right pet sitter for you. On of the best ways you can evaluate a quality pet sitter is by ensuring you check for references. Testimonials on a website are a great place to start. You can also ask for a reference list of previous or current clients. Verifying their references not only helps ensure that they’re qualified professionals, and also allows you to get a better sense of what the pet sitting experience will actually be like. It’s also important to verify that a potential pet sitter or pet sitting company is insured and bonded. Accidents do happen! Can they provide documentation and prove they’re protected? It’s also important to ensure the pet sitter knows how to handle emergencies and has a plan in place in case anything comes up. Check the terms of your contract. Then check them again. And again. Be sure that all agreed-upon services... read more
Meet Taye

Meet Taye

Meet Taye, a rescued greyhound from Greyhound Rescue of Austin. While the first words that come to mind when thinking of rescuing a greyhound are zoom zoom, think again! From personal experience, docile, snuggly, gentle, sweet, and easy-peasy are now the first words that come to my mind! If you’ve never thought about about rescuing a greyhound, please visit a rescue group. Click the links to learn more about Greyhound Rescue of Austin or apply for greyhound... read more

Don’t Freak Out If Your Dog Eats Poop

You’ve probably seen this: you’re out on a walk with your dog, his sniffs around at another animal’s poop… and then he tries to eat it! Or, he might try to eat his own poop immediately after relieving himself. (And if you’re not quick about it, he’s probably successful.) You might feel disgusted, or at the very least concerned, especially if it happens frequently. Is it going to make him sick? Is something wrong with him that he’s eating poop? As it turns out, there are a number of reasons why your dog might try to eat poop (also known as coprophagia). And while you shouldn’t encourage this habit in your dog by any means, the fact that your pet tries is perfectly normal. If your dog is a puppy, eating poop is an especially common behavior. As yet, there’s no definitive explanation as to why, but among other things, one popular explanation suggests that they’re simply exploring their environments and being curious. Puppies who eat poop typically outgrow this behavior when they’re about six months old. If your dog recently had puppies and is nursing, you might find her ingesting her pups’ poo. Again, this is perfectly normal behavior. Like humans, puppies can’t take care of their own elimination needs right away. They need some help… and that usually involves mom ingesting at least some of what they produce. But what if your dog falls outside these two categories? In that case, there are still a whole host of explanations. Your dog might have a nutritional deficiency, and trying to recoup missing resources. Your dog might even just... read more

Meet Grommit!

Some of us need caffeine. Grommit, a fun-loving Labradoodle, just needs his big orange slobbery bouncy ball to wake up in the mornings. He only takes breaks for water, food, and when Molly has that once in a blue moon opportunity to get the ball before... read more

Physical Therapy Benefits For Pets

Attention and patience should be administered while helping our pets recover from injuries or to stay in peak condition as they age. There are many activities that may sound more like boot camp activities at your gym, but are great for our healing animals.

read more